Photos of the transit of Venus

Transit of Venus

One of the most talked about events for 2012 in terms of astronomy is the transit of Venus across the Sun.  Perhaps one of the most significant reasons for this is that it will be a "once-in-a-life-time" event for many (unless you saw it in 2004 when it last happened).  It is predicted that the next time it will occur is in December 2117.  The transit takes place when Venus passes between the earth and the sun and is seen as a small disk or black dot moving across the face of the sun. Now while this is quite a rare occurrence it is not that easy to see or even photograph unless you are prepared for it and have the right equipment.  Then even if you do have the right gear it really does just look like an orange disk (or white depending on the filter used) with a few random dots (sun spots) and a more perfectly round disk (Venus) that moves slowly.

The photos below use the Olympus OM-D E-M5, with a MMF-2 adapter (unfortunately Olympus haven't shipped me the new MMF-3 adapter yet) and a T-adapter for a Meade Telescope.  The Telescope used was a Meade 125 with a commercial solar filter (for the orange looking photos) and a home made filter (for the Black and white photos).  The photos were imported into Apple Aperture for a quick edit before being uploaded.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 1/250th Shutter

Olympus OM-D E-M5 1/125th Shutter

Olympus OM-D E-M5 1/125th Shutter

Olympus OM-D E-M5 1/125th Shutter

The transit of Venus can be likened to that of a solar eclipse by the moon, however, Venus is a lot further away so looks quite small in comparison.  The image below depicts a partial Lunar eclipse (this is where the Earth has partially blocked the suns rays) that occurred on Monday evening  (4/06/2012) in the southern hemisphere.

 

 

 

Comments

Hey Shaun,

Wow,your photos are better than the real thing.

By Maryam (not verified)

Thanx Maryam!

By Shaun

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